Innovation killers: how to recognize and eliminate reluctance

In our previous blog about innovation, we discussed why it is important for organizations to embrace innovation. Today, we would like to help you tackle a related issue: innovation killers.

Many organizations have employees who want to innovate, but who cannot seem to get their initiatives off the ground. The majority tends to cling onto the ‘safe’ status quo, which makes it risky to pursue innovative ideas. After all, if it goes wrong – and it often does the first two or three attempts – you will be held accountable in an innovation-unfriendly environment.

This is a shame, because sticking to old habits inevitably means that you won’t improve. Below, we will list three common innovation killers. If you can recognize and address them, it is easier to eliminate reluctance and take your first steps towards innovation!

1. Being swayed by the issues of the day

Most companies are always busy organizing sales, delivery, and transportation. Oftentimes, innovative initiatives have to make room for such urgent matters. However, if you think about it, organizations with this mentality are fighting a losing battle.

After all, they can’t improve their efficiency. It is only sensible to take a moment to consider why your processes are organized the way they are. Only then, you can spot the gaps and make improvements.

 2. Compliance-related concerns

There is an ever-increasing amount of laws and regulations that you need to comply with. Consequently, many decision makers leave the green-lighting of new initiatives to their IT compliance experts.

However, experience shows that the answer completely depends on the individual handling a proposal: many people reject initiatives because they are afraid to make a compliance-related mistake.

Due to the associated fear of things going awry, compliance can be a real innovation killer. Therefore, a change in mindset is crucial: organizations and their employees need to realize that compliance can actually assist in setting up innovative initiatives.

 3. The widely dreaded bureaucracy

Many organizations are hindered by the seemingly countless departments a proposal needs to pass through before any action can be taken. Employees with innovative ideas are often scared away by such drawn-out processes. They give up before they have even tried.

One way to break through this cycle of bureaucracy is to take calculated risks. On a case-by-case basis, try to determine whether it is acceptable to opt for a faster-than-usual route when it comes to an innovative initiative.

If so, you could try it out among a small number of end customers. Have them sign a contract stating that they are aware of being in a test group upfront. This will reassure the legal department and ensure that your end customers are involved in your innovation process!

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